Would You Spend $400k On This Rocker Armchair?

Art & Design

September 29, 2017 | BY AFP

Collectible pieces from designers Josef Frank, Marc Newson and more will be available at the Sotheby's Design Auction.

Joris LaarmanRocker' armchair (All photos: Courtesy of Sotheby's)

World-leading contemporary designers such as Josef Frank, Joris Laarman and Marc Newson will be participating in the 'Design: Living in a Material World'  auction in London.

The auction is dedicated to showcasing new and cutting-edge creations by a selection of international designers that have been described as "the best pieces of design around at the moment." The sale itself will be preceded by an exhibition and a series of talks.

Highlights from the sale include a 3D-printed armchair by the experimental Dutch designer Joris Laarman. Laarman is most known for his designs that experiment with emerging technologies. His "Rocker" armchair, made using powdered Belge Noir marble and resin, is expected to sell for £170,000-200,000.

A table milled from one single piece of marble by Marc Newson is also one of the hotly anticipated pieces of the evening. "Extruded Table 3," 2008, is estimated at £70,000-100,000. Chosen by Time magazine in 2005 as one of the 100 most influential people in the world, Newson's work is believed to represent 25 per cent of the contemporary design market. In 2015 he won the GQ Man of the Year Awards in the Creative Icon category.

Marc Newson Extruded Table 3', 2008

A couple of "superb examples" of furniture by the designer Josef Frank will also be going under the hammer. The Austrian-Swedish designer's "Flora" bureau and cabinet, a blend of "Viennese elegance and Swedish functionalism," were created using hand-colored botanical paper prints from Carl Lindman's "Bilder ur Nordens Flora" book. They are estimated at £20,000-£30,000 and £30,000-£50,000 respectively.

Other highlights from the upcoming sale include a pair of stools from Swedish designer Axel Einar Hjorth's "Utö" collection (1932), a Thomas Heatherwick chair in Murano glass, and a cabinet by Studio Job that combines 17th-century carpentry skills with modern laser technology.

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