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Weddings 2021 Wedding Trends to Know, According to Singapore's Top Wedding Planners

2021 Wedding Trends to Know, According to Singapore's Top Wedding Planners

<span>Photo by <a href="https://unsplash.com/@jeremywongweddings?utm_source=unsplash&amp;utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_content=creditCopyText">Jeremy Wong Weddings</a> on <a href="https://unsplash.com/?utm_source=unsplash&amp;utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_content=creditCopyText">Unsplash</a></span>
(Image: Jeremy Wong Weddings/Unsplash)
By Chloe Pek
January 03, 2021
Planning a 2021 wedding? Here are some trends and interesting details to elevate your special day

2020 has been a tumultuous year for couples who had originally planned to wed. Cancellations and postponements were common in the early stage of the Covid-19 outbreak, evolving to virtual weddings and eventually intimate, micro-weddings as restrictions ease. As of October 3, the capacity for wedding receptions has been expanded to 100 unique attendees (including the wedding couple, excluding vendors and service providers), split across multiple zones of up to 50 persons each. This is likely to be relaxed further when Singapore enters Phase 3 on December 28.

With restrictions stabilising by next year, we ask Singapore's leading wedding planners for the trends to look out for in 2021 and interesting details couples can incorporate to their wedding.

(Related: Princess Diana’s Godson, Prince Philippos of Greece and Denmark, Weds Long-Term Girlfriend Nina Flohr)

A thoughtful gift box Box customised by PapyPress (Image: Maritha Mae/The Wildest Dreams)
A thoughtful gift box Box customised by PapyPress (Image: Maritha Mae/The Wildest Dreams)

Meaningful micro-weddings

Amidst the Covid-19 measures, micro-weddings became an inevitable trend adopted by couples in Singapore, as well as other affected countries. But as restrictions ease on the number of guests, this format of weddings is likely to continue to be popular, allowing newly-weds to focus on spending quality time with the ones that matter most, while lowering the risk of transmissions.

“As couples opt for intimate celebrations, we are beginning to see couples spend more on personalised elements, such as a special memory written on each menu card, customised napkins and printed tablecloths, and even unique wedding favours. For example, personalised glassware with guests’ names add a meticulous touch to weddings these days, we wouldn't want to drink from someone else's glass by accident during a pandemic!” Ashley, founder and principal planner of The Wildest Dreams says.

“We also think it’s a nice gesture to prepare some thoughtful wedding favours that take into consideration the guests' safety first. It allows the guests to feel ensured that their health and safety have been taken into consideration during the wedding planning process.”

The smaller scale also allows couples to opt for grander decor and experiences, as Herlina Makmur, wedding planner at Chere Weddings observes.

“It could be with more extravagant flower arrangements or an enhanced dining experience or guests with a private chef at home.”

Jessica and Alvin’s wedding at Capella Singapore (Image: Highest Kite Weddings/Capella Singapore)
Jessica and Alvin’s wedding at Capella Singapore (Image: Highest Kite Weddings/Capella Singapore)

Enhanced guest experiences

With live performances still in its pilot phase, couples have been exploring alternative entertainment options for their weddings.

“The last we want is to have a dull wedding where the guests are bored. We always believe that hiring a professional emcee is a good investment, especially during this period of time. An emcee can help to facilitate the event better by ensuring that the safety guidelines are being conveyed to the guests, and they can also warm up the crowd,” advises Ashley from The Wildest Dreams.

“Instead of the usual childhood montages, couples could put together a slideshow that not only chronicles their relationship but features the guests who are present. More speeches can be done by loved ones to make the event a more meaningful celebration, while trivia quizzes or contests can help to connect the guests.”

Ashley also suggests incorporating technology, such as live streaming, virtual photo booths, and wedding websites.

“Guests attending the wedding or viewing the live stream remotely can scan a QR code, which will lead them to a website where they can dedicate online messages to the couple, or even take a selfie with the virtual photo booths!”

(Related: These Couples Got Married During the Covid-19 Outbreak—Here’s How They Held Their Weddings in Singapore and Hong Kong)

The wedding of Jaron and Helen at Jewel Changi Airport (Photo: Hong Ray Photography)
The wedding of Jaron and Helen at Jewel Changi Airport (Image: Hong Ray Photography/TE Planner)

Going local

Since overseas proposals and wedding shoots are no longer an option for the near future, going local is on the rise—but that doesn’t mean couples are ready to compromise.

“Without the stunning scenery of the Mykonos or the Côte d'Azur to set the scene for the perfect proposal, our clients are sparing no expense to recreate the same magic here,” Caroline Tan-Reed, founder of The Wedding Stylist shares.

“One client planned a week of events for his fiancée-to be, starting with a surprise lunch to a private spa treatment. We had a makeup artist and hairstylist arrive to dress her up for the occasion, and a selection of outfits for her to choose from. She was escorted to a path leading outdoors where her fiancé-to-be stood waiting amongst a lush garden setting that we had created. Of course, she said yes!”

Likewise, couples are increasingly engaging stylists to design and conceptualise their local photoshoots.

“We recently planned a trip out on a yacht where we decked up the boat with flowers, set up a champagne brunch and curated a few sets of outfits for each different look, ending with a fun twist where the couple leapt off the yacht together in a coordinated jump at sunset.”

(Related: A Wedding that Took Place at Two Iconic Buildings In Singapore: Jewel Changi Airport and Marina Bay Sands)

Dried flowers arranged by Still Life Floral (Image: Titien Wang Studios/The Wildest Dreams)
Dried flowers arranged by Still Life Floral (Image: Titien Wang Studios/The Wildest Dreams)

Sustainability

Couples have been becoming more environmentally conscious in recent years, and it shows no sign of stopping. From choosing an eco-friendly venue to reusing flowers and decor, it's the little touches that count.

“Dried and recycled flowers can be used for styling decorations, floral bouquets or corsages! The couple can also find creative ways to recycle the dried florals to construct a unique headpiece or heirloom that can be preserved and kept as a meaningful keepsake,” Caroline recommends.

“As the global pandemic takes a toll on the economy, more wedding couples are leaning towards supporting local vendors, in hopes that we can all tide through these tough times together.

Couples can explore having wedding favours that are sourced and produced locally from local home bakers or creative crafters.”

(Related: How to Have a Sustainable Wedding in Singapore)

Tags

Weddings micro-weddings wedding planning wedding trends 2021 wedding trends wedding vendors wedding planners the wildest dreams the wedding stylist chere weddings sustainable wedding wedding entertainment wedding favours

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