TATLER FOCUS

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Pronunciation: /ae̯ˈter.ni.taːs/, [ae̯ˈtɛr.nɪ.taːs]

To delve into the world of Franck Muller’s Aeternitas, we must first answer the question: what exactly is a watch complication?

Simply put, it’s a watchmaking function above and beyond the time-telling function. It could be a minute repeater, which chimes the time; a chronograph, which measures intervals of time; or even an annual calendar, which displays the date, month and year and only needs correcting on February 28 or 29 of every year. And that’s just the start of what watchmakers can do.

(Related: Which Franck Muller Vanguard 7 Days Power Reserve Skeleton Is For You?)

Franck Muller’s moniker should give you a clue into the type of watches you can expect: nicknamed the Master of Complications, the watchmaker made its name constructing watches that are incredibly complex, as evinced by its Aeternitas collection. The word means eternity in Latin. Released in increasing order of complexity, this collection of six watches reinforce Franck Muller’s reputation as the Master of Complications.

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Franck Muller Aeternitas Mega  4

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Franck Muller Aeternitas Mega 

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Franck Muller Aeternitas Mega 1

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Franck Muller Aeternitas Mega 3

Beginning with a beautiful flying tourbillon cased in the highly complex Cintrée Curvex shape, Franck Muller gradually added different complications to the watch, including long power reserve, chronograph, 24-hour indication, perpetual calendar, equation of time, moon phase indication, and finally, grande and petite sonnerie in the sixth piece named Aeternitas Mega, launched in 2010. At the time of its unveiling, the Mega was the most complicated wristwatch in the world, with 36 complications and 1,483 components.

(Related:The Watch Expert's Guide: B For Barrel)

Tags: Franck Muller, complicated watches, Tick Talk, Aeternitas